smart girls with adhd (and a story)

Within the last few days, I’ve become connected with Beth of Smart Girls with ADHD.

And let me say… I LOVE THIS.

People with ADHD are usually creative, idea generators, outside-the-box thinkers, and… yes, SMART!

The hard part is, often, we don’t feel like we’re smart. I sometimes feel like all of the awesome associated with having ADHD has been overshadowed by the struggles I experience because of ADHD. I’ve said it many times: I am relieved I can explain some of my quirks through disclosing my ADHD… but, in no way do I wish to become defined by it—nor do I want to use it as an excuse. ADHD is a part of me—I’m okay with talking about it, self advocating: I say it frequently on #LDchat: put it in terms people understand, in context. Situation + adaptation.

“I have ADHD[/learning issues], and [in x situation], I may need [y adaptation].”

I have ADHD and learning issues, and when learning a new skill, I may need the steps written down.

I have ADHD, and in a long lecture, I may need to quietly slip out to go do a few flights of stairs.

I have ADHD, and it helps me to study with earphones in so I can block out the external noise and focus on only one source of sound—yes, seriously.

I have learning issues, so if you can provide visual information to me in words, this works a lot better for me.

I have ADHD, and I sometimes get overwhelmed in large group conversations. I may need to ask for clarification. I have processing speed issues, so sometimes I need to jump back a few bullet points to catch up.

I have learning issues affecting my visual memory—this makes me terrible at names, so please remind me of yours and I’ll keep trying!

I will keep trying.

Another real life story:
A few weeks ago, I went into work, and was told we didn’t have a paper schedule for the tennis matches for the day. I usually use my paper schedule to write down court numbers and check in players so all the information is right in front of me, but I figured it was a good learning opportunity to try to be efficient using the computer. I did okay but struggled a bit. The next day, I opted to print my own schedule of the matches (to alter!) to help keep me organized—except, I failed to cross-check with the computer, and told a doubles team to come at the wrong time as based on my paper schedule. Let’s say their opponents weren’t impressed, but thankfully didn’t ream me out!

That’s when it’s hard: when I try my hardest to be smart. To work with it. To work with what I know is a challenge for me, and then I still mess up.

Yet, being diagnosed with ADHD was what taught me I am not stupid. As a girl with ADHD, I don’t present the same way as boys do: I’m not necessarily hyper—or not hyper in the same ways; I’m not loud when I’m not supposed to be; I can often sit for long periods of time—sometimes I can be lucky enough to hyperfocus when it’s opportune. But just because it doesn’t look like what people perceive ADHD as, doesn’t mean I don’t have it. Just because people see me as smart, just because I seem to be doing well, just because, because, BECAUSE… doesn’t mean anything. I compensate to make things work—sometimes I don’t even think about it—but I put more effort into a LOT of things than people would ever guess to make it look like I’ve got it together.

It took my ADHD diagnosis to realize I’m not stupid.

To phrase that again:

Being diagnosed with ADHD taught me I am smart.

And I will keep trying.

 

Thanks to Beth for making me an admin of the Smart Girls with ADHD Facebook group. If you’re a woman with ADHD, I hope you’ll join us!

purple [surprisingly not-fail] cookies

I don’t consider myself a baker (and I especially don’t consider myself a cook). But sometimes I find recipes online that seem basically too good to be true that they are THAT SIMPLE. And I have to try them.

Today like two weeks ago when I started this post was a variation on “Cinnamon Roll Cheesecake Cookies” from Wine and Glue.

Except not cinnamon roll and not cheesecake.

That would be too easy, right? [Also does cheesecake pudding even exist in Canada?]

So, because I can’t adhere to the prescribed ingredient list, despite that only three things were listed, we got this:

  • 1 package sugar cookie mix plus the ingredients to make the cookies
  • 1 package of Cinnamon Roll Flavor Creations from Duncan Hines
    • INSTEAD: 1 package of White Chocolatey Raspberry Frosting Creations Mix from Duncan Hines.
  • 1 box of Cheesecake Flavor Pudding mix (just the dry mix)
    • Omitted. Because I thought I had
  • 1 cup white chocolate chips

http://i0.wp.com/farm9.staticflickr.com/8798/18173170488_c90e2fbdfc.jpg?resize=375%2C500&ssl=1http://i1.wp.com/farm9.staticflickr.com/8854/17738370804_8e961e752a.jpg?resize=375%2C500&ssl=1http://i2.wp.com/farm1.staticflickr.com/294/18356936212_197a1bc811.jpg?resize=375%2C500&ssl=1

And yes, they were too sweet, but no, they were actually not terrible. And very soft.

I’ll cut back on sugar next time and probably not use raspberry.
(Caramel might be good, though.)